Shell transforms petrol station into electric vehicle charging centre., Electric Vehicle News Bitesize
Shell transforms petrol station into electric vehicle charging centre., Electric Vehicle News Bitesize

Shell transforms petrol station into electric vehicle charging centre.

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Shell has opened its first all-electric vehicle charging centre on the site of a former petrol station in London.

Oil giant Shell has transformed one of its former petrol stations into the country’s first electric vehicle charging “centre”, following a 110% increase in UK drivers buying an electric vehicle between 2020 and 2021.

Shell transforms petrol station located on Fulham Road, South West London, the site features 9 fast chargers delivering up to 175kW, a mini Waitrose, Costa Coffee and free WiFi.

Formerly a traditional petrol station, the hub has been in development since 2019.

Ultra-fast charging points deliver power three times faster than fast 50kW chargers, which typically charge from 0% to 80% in 30 minutes.

But the move happened despite the closure of forecourts across the country in recent years.

There are now just over 8,000 petrol and diesel stations in the UK, down 5,000 since 2020.

That’s a drop of about 35 percent, causing drivers to find it harder to fill up in both rural areas and city centres.

BP, ESSO and Shell each operate more than 1,000 sites, while Tesco has 509 sites.

However, despite fewer stations, supermarket retailers sell most of the fuel each year.

1833, Marcus Samuel decided to expand his business in London. He already sold antiques, but decided to try selling oriental shells, capitalizing on their popularity in the interior design industry at the time. The demand was so great that he started importing shells from the Far East, laying the foundation for an import and export business that would eventually become one of the world’s leading energy companies.

When Marcus Samuel senior died in 1870 he passed the business on to his two sons, Marcus junior and Samuel, who began to expand it. In the 1880s they became particularly interested in the oil exporting business but shipping still posed a problem as oil was carried in barrels which could leak and took up a lot of space. To solve the problem, they commissioned a fleet of steamers to carry oil in bulk, including the Murex which, in 1892, became the first oil tanker to pass through the Suez Canal.

The immediate post-war years were some of the toughest Shell had yet faced. Reconstruction was very expensive and the market for oil was changing rapidly. Against this backdrop Shell launched new exploration programmes in Africa and South America and built new refineries in the UK. The company also invested in larger and higher-powered ships – supertankers – in order to carry more oil in bulk.

In 1947, the first commercially viable offshore well was drilled in the Gulf of Mexico and within 8 years the company had over 300 such wells. New discoveries were also made in Borneo and the Niger Delta, and commercial production of oil in Nigeria began in 1958.

A number of scientific advances at this time boosted the demand for oil, including the invention of the jet engine – its architect Sir Frank Whittle even worked for the company for a number of years.

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Shell transforms petrol station into electric vehicle charging centre., Electric Vehicle News Bitesize